Water Procurement

Topics about survival techniques and situations
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wildman
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Water Procurement

Post by wildman » Tue Jul 01, 2003 5:03 pm

Water is one of your most urgent needs in a survival situation. You can't live long without it, especially in hot areas where you lose water rapidly through perspiration. Even in cold areas, you need a minimum of 2 liters of water each day to maintain efficiency.

More than three-fourths of your body is composed of fluids. Your body loses fluid as a result of heat, cold, stress, and exertion. To function effectively, you must replace the fluid your body loses. So, one of your first goals in a desert survival situation is to obtain an adequate supply of water.

SteveS
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Re: Water Procurement

Post by SteveS » Wed Jul 02, 2003 8:38 am

wildman wrote:Water is one of your most urgent needs in a survival situation. ......So, one of your first goals in a desert survival situation is to obtain an adequate supply of water.
Thats why we carry extra. I have run across people who carry 1 gal of anti-freeze. Not me, I carry water. If you are in a survial situation, you don't need to have you car to manufacture's specs to dive it a few days. So both you and your can can use water, but how helpful is that gal of anti-freese if you need water?

I have also found that if I carry water in one large container, it heats alot slower, back when I carrier my water in bottles (1 liter) in warmed up faster. I find that I drink more water when the water is cooler, not cold, but not bath temp either. :)

:idea: Anyone else have any tips to help replace "carried items" that drinking water can replace, or ways to carry extra water. OR any desert water tips??


I read on one of the desert boards about some guy who ran out of water and became a "wildman" was that you??? :D :D

wildman
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Post by wildman » Wed Jul 02, 2003 8:53 am

no that wasnt me!

Bighorn
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Post by Bighorn » Wed Jul 02, 2003 4:23 pm

Welcome to death-valley.us Wildman!
SteveS wrote: Anyone else have any tips to help replace "carried items" that drinking water can replace, or ways to carry extra water. OR any desert water tips??
I don't know. If you travel with the car, the water is not of concern and I don't remember that somebody died lately because lack of it.
The average trip length is 3-4 days and 7-10 gallons of water is plenty for 2 persons (those who need shower twice a day shouldn't camp in the desert).
If you are hiker you cache the water in advance.

Extreme situations... Well, that's another story.
You'll have far greater chance to survive if you learn from nature rather than survival books.

wildman
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Post by wildman » Wed Jul 02, 2003 5:35 pm

Thanks for ther warm welcome!
Anyone else have any tips to help replace "carried items" that drinking water can replace, or ways to carry extra water. OR any desert water tips??
One way to help retain the water that you drink is to add a little salt to the water 8)

Lee
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Post by Lee » Thu Jul 03, 2003 2:54 pm

My vehicle of choice is an aircooled VW powered Manx buggy, so all of the water can be used for drinking, cooking, and cleaning. You get to ration water without having to consider the vehicle. I also use ice in my cooler instead of those blue packs, as melted ice is water that can be used in an emergency (there's one more reason to keep your cooler clean). Use one big block of ice, fill the cooler with all the food and drinks, then fill up any additional space with crushed ice.

Back when I used to have a rail buggy that required a trailer, we would set up a base camp of two to three trucks. The trucks and trailer would stay there for the entire time, while we took the buggy and bikes out exploring. Two of the trucks had new 30 gallon trash cans filled with water we had brought from home. We put a fountain pump in one of the cans and powered it with an inverter connected to the truck's battery. Three people could take several showers a day for several days with this configuration. We got through many very hot summers like that, and enjoyed the place to ourselves. We also typically had several gallons left over at the end of the trip.

Manx camping has significant advantages regarding logistics, but every pound you carry has to be carefully considered. I will never forget those days we had too much water in the desert.

Lee

Subterranean
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Post by Subterranean » Tue Jul 08, 2003 11:58 am

Ancient Incas paid attention to the faults in the surrounding rock mountains. Rain water would not penetrate the rock but would flow down thru the fault lines & collected in underground aquifers which they mapped out. Taking note of the direction the fault when it reached ground level, they could use common sense & follow it to a lowland area & almost surely find water after just a short dig.

Unfortunately I don't think much digging is allowed in a National Park like DV so bring your air-cooled VW!

cj-7
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Post by cj-7 » Wed Oct 29, 2003 5:22 pm

I found this interesting: http://www.sodis.ch/Text2002/T-Howdoesitwork.htm
-carl

outlierrn
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Post by outlierrn » Thu Oct 25, 2007 11:51 am

Lots of bicycle shops carry electrolyte replacement tabs that can be disolved in water, not a bad idea for extended activity/sweating. Lots of plain water without salt replacement can be dangerous too.
Larry

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