Desert Survival Tip #1034

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Bighorn
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Desert Survival Tip #1034

Post by Bighorn » Thu May 15, 2003 1:53 pm

Take good maps. Stopping to ask directions only works when there are people nearby.

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ccv
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Post by ccv » Thu May 15, 2003 5:02 pm

Sounds like a good tip to me! Also helps if one knows how to read the maps they have with them! :wink:
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Re: Desert Survival Tip #1034

Post by SteveS » Fri May 16, 2003 11:38 am

bighorn wrote:Take good maps.
Some things shouldn't be posted on the net. If people learn this, I'm not going to have any new "lost people" stories.

We had a guy pull into our camp in AB, not only was he lost, and no map, he didn't know North from South, it was 15 minutes before sundown (clue one, setting sun), and he wanted to argue about how to get to pavement, and town.

Then again there was the mapless nut with the flat tire (spare didn't fit)who spent a cold night and walked 3 miles to a road that was also a 1/8 mile in the other direction, on the loop road he was on.

Mapless people is the #1 reason to go to parks on 3-day weekend. :D

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ccv
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Post by ccv » Fri May 16, 2003 1:04 pm

Steve, were you with us when we were starting out on the dirt road that leads to the Bodie railway from Mono Lake after doing the canoe tour and the guy was in front of our whole tour in his car? We stopped him and asked him where he was going and he said he was going to the canoe tour. Don't know if he had a map or not, but he obviously couldn't read the signs that he had to of past by before turning on the road he was on. I remember we told him to turn around and go back to the main dirt road then head towards the lake and he'd find the canoe tours. We also warned him that if he continued on he would get stuck in the pumice. He didn't really want to believe us, but eventually realized we were right. There are always going to be people who give the rest of us the chance to steer them in the right direction because they can't or won't read signs or maps, even when they are right in front of their face! Maybe they just like to the rest of us feel useful? :wink:
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Post by cetrov » Thu Dec 11, 2003 9:44 am

How about -
Let the park rangers know where you are going and when you expect to be back - they will come looking for you if you do not check in with them. But you had better check in when you get back.

At least that is what the told me they like people to do.

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Post by Morrie » Thu Apr 01, 2004 6:16 pm

This reminds me of an encounter a couple of years ago at the car-campsite on the south end of the Racetrack. It was summer and around 7pm, when a compact car drove by our campsite from north to south rather fast. This seemed unusual since hardly anyone went there in summer, and besides this was a dead end for cars. A few minutes later it came back, and the driver, a German tourist in a rental car, asked which way was out. He had no apparent supplies of any kind with him. We told him out was about 30 miles north back to the paved road, but he insisted there was a road south. He had in his hand a small Michelin tourist map of Death Valley, which actually showed the Lippincott Rd. as the way out! He did not seem very happy having to take the incredibly long way around. He acted like he needed to get back to L.A to catch a plane or something. So much for maps and shortcuts.

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Post by LarryW » Fri Nov 11, 2005 8:48 am

The problem with "Good Maps" is that you don't know how GOOD it is untill you use it... or try to... I'll never purchase a map at the visitors center again... They have very nice videos in there though...Go figure...

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Post by ahamacav » Sat Nov 12, 2005 9:10 am

Maps suck the thrill out of the purity of wandering.
Visit my web site, everyday, ... all day long - http://digital-desert.com/

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Post by LarryW » Sat Nov 12, 2005 9:45 am

Maps suck the thrill out of the purity of wandering.
I agree with that however wandering around on asphalt is not what I call wandering... And if you DO have a map, it should be accurate...

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Post by ahamacav » Sat Nov 12, 2005 8:49 pm

LarryW wrote:
Maps suck the thrill out of the purity of wandering.
I agree with that however wandering around on asphalt is not what I call wandering... And if you DO have a map, it should be accurate...
And I agree with you back.
Visit my web site, everyday, ... all day long - http://digital-desert.com/

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Post by Rubiblue » Sat Dec 17, 2005 8:31 pm

Maps are only for those that get lost. Too many people tell me where to go for that to happen to me!

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Post by Castle » Tue Dec 20, 2005 7:11 pm

I remember a time I was out in Goler at the cabin. I was standing in the road talking to one of Kurt DuShanes {sp?} geologists when we heard a vehicle coming up canyon. Well this young lady, in a basic street type car {yes, Goler was in GOOD condition that year} drove on past as she waved and kept on motoring. We looked at each other and shook our heads. Well we chatted some more and then heard a vehicle coming down canyon. Sure enough, here she come again. Stopped this time. She was totally lost, no extra water, or food and wan't shure where she was trying to get back too. We gave her some water, think she turned down a beer, and got her pointed in the right direction.

I understand "purity of wandering", I've done bunches of it, when I had no schedual or place to be at any given time. But, What is it with people who have no clue how to get where they are going, but take off anyway????

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Common Sense

Post by NSBFRANK » Sun Feb 19, 2006 4:22 pm

Cetrov Previously Wrote:
How about - Let the park rangers know where you are going and when you expect to be back - they will come looking for you if you do not check in with them. But you had better check in when you get back.

At least that is what the told me they like people to do.

*************************************************************
That is a good definition of COMMON-SENSE. The above was instilled upon me from both my Dad and from Scout Leaders during my time in the Cub Scouts and the many visits to DV and other NP's. Rangers that I have spoken to at many National Patks will tell you that, unfortunately, some folks who fill out the "BackCountry Travel Form" never have the courtesy to "check back in" or at the least call to inform them that they are through with their trip. It results in wasted time for all involved. In the Summer (as well as every other season) at DV there is no excuse for not adhering to this Common-Sense, life saving, 5 minute routine. The thought of vultures poking at my eyes outweighs the "purity of wandering" (though the poetic vision is appreciated).
KXY

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wandering without maps

Post by ChinaLakeKid » Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:06 pm

I think that wandering around without a map is a pretty risky undertaking. In the literature forum I posted a note about this great book Jon Krakauer wrote titled Into the Wild. It's the gripping true story of this 23 year old kid who did just that - wandered off into the Alaska wilderness without a map of any kind. Although he was only about 25 miles off the main road from Fairbanks to Anchorage, and maybe 30 miles from Healy, Alaska - he couldn't orient himself as to nearby sources of food and aid, and when he got into trouble (by ingesting some seeds of a plant that his wild food foraging book never mentioned were poisonous), he ended up starving to death. Some hikers came across his corpse about 19 or 20 days after he died, and his corpse only weighed something like 67 lbs. The kid was resourceful - he lived for about 4 months on just a bag of rice, what he could forage for food, or kill (not an easy thing to do). But in the end, he died because he had no maps to orient himself.
Biological systems are replicating machines that parse molecular code (DNA) and a variety of feedback to grow macro-scale beings. These highly evolved systems can be hijacked and reprogrammed to great effect. -Steve Jurvetson

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Post by beast » Mon Oct 09, 2006 5:29 am

I was just a wee lad when I learn that a compass fit in a pocket, and didn't take up much room, and wasen't heavy. It has helped me afew times. {Not that I was lost, :roll: :lol: just turned alittle}

:lol: :lol:
[center]Image

Don't have one. Don't want one. Not getting one[/center]

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